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PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2017 2:39 pm 
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Location: Placerville California
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
new one at West County Bamboo in Santa Rosa ( I emailed them after the fire and they said they are ok )

Bambusa textilis " Moralensis"

this is on my wish list now and hoping it will live in my climate


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Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Placerville Ca
Elevation 3000 ft
Zone 8B ( probably 8A )
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:44 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
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Location: Esparto, CA
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Thanks for posting this, stupid Facebook doesn't work well for me as I don't have an account. I wonder how much this one costs? I think I'll head over there in a couple weeks to check them out anyway.

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Brad Salmon, zone 9 Esparto, CA


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:51 pm 
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Location: Placerville California
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his post only said that it was only available there which makes since as it sounds new and has his last name in the botanical name.
id be curious to know size and pricing as well.

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Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Placerville Ca
Elevation 3000 ft
Zone 8B ( probably 8A )


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2017 7:45 pm 
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Location: Placerville California
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
125.00 for a one gallon is what I was told :? Well I'll probably still try it

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Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Placerville Ca
Elevation 3000 ft
Zone 8B ( probably 8A )


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2017 9:45 pm 
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Location: Lithia Florida
Interesting. I’d like to see a side-by-side comparison between this and B. Textiles albostriata. Looks very similar except for the single predominantly yellow internode

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 4:52 am 
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Location: Placerville California
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shuboo wrote:
Interesting. I’d like to see a side-by-side comparison between this and B. Textiles albostriata. Looks very similar except for the single predominantly yellow internode


are most albostriata culms this pinstriped? i see some that look nice and many with hardly any

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Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Placerville Ca
Elevation 3000 ft
Zone 8B ( probably 8A )


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 11:08 pm 
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Location: Lithia Florida
No, not quite as nicely as the ones in the pic. Did you go to the nursery and check theirs out? Just curious if all of theirs are this heavily striped. If so, this is a great ssp. There are a few other species that give the plant in the pic a run for it’s money, but, they aren’t a textilis. The cold hardiness alone makes this a fantastic bamboo. Looking forward to seeing more of it

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 1:40 am 
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Location: Placerville California
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shuboo wrote:
No, not quite as nicely as the ones in the pic. Did you go to the nursery and check theirs out? Just curious if all of theirs are this heavily striped. If so, this is a great ssp. There are a few other species that give the plant in the pic a run for it’s money, but, they aren’t a textilis. The cold hardiness alone makes this a fantastic bamboo. Looking forward to seeing more of it


no not yet but id like to see there mother plant. the only two Bambusa i think will grow here for me are multiplex varieties and textilis varieties. Though we can get into the teens once or twice a year some years are biggest thing here is it can freeze anytime from October through May and from mid November thru April most nights are close to or below freezing. i would like to try more varieties if anyone knows of any
:)

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Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Placerville Ca
Elevation 3000 ft
Zone 8B ( probably 8A )


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 9:19 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 5:28 am
Posts: 233
Location: Southeast Texas, Zone 9a
Cooper12 wrote:
shuboo wrote:
No, not quite as nicely as the ones in the pic. Did you go to the nursery and check theirs out? Just curious if all of theirs are this heavily striped. If so, this is a great ssp. There are a few other species that give the plant in the pic a run for it’s money, but, they aren’t a textilis. The cold hardiness alone makes this a fantastic bamboo. Looking forward to seeing more of it


no not yet but id like to see there mother plant. the only two Bambusa i think will grow here for me are multiplex varieties and textilis varieties. Though we can get into the teens once or twice a year some years are biggest thing here is it can freeze anytime from October through May and from mid November thru April most nights are close to or below freezing. i would like to try more varieties if anyone knows of any
:)

While winter hardiness is certainly multifactorial, and results will vary, I can say that Bambusa chungii has shown hardiness just slightly behind that of Bambusa textilis, at least in the Houston area. I am really just not experienced with your West Coast climate zones, but if B. textilis keeps most of its leaves through most of your winters, I think B. chungii is worth trying on an experimental basis.

Also, while there seems to be no discussion about this species, Bambusa distegia has shown some promise for me. It went through 22 degrees F last winter with no more damage than B. textilis or B. multiplex. This was a cold snap after weeks of extremely warm weather. Many normally hardy plants in this area were killed because of the extreme temperature swing. This species has not produced many culms, but it has gained size rapidly. I hope to post more about this species once I have more experience with it.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 4:55 pm 
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Location: Lithia Florida
Glen wrote:
Cooper12 wrote:
shuboo wrote:
No, not quite as nicely as the ones in the pic. Did you go to the nursery and check theirs out? Just curious if all of theirs are this heavily striped. If so, this is a great ssp. There are a few other species that give the plant in the pic a run for it’s money, but, they aren’t a textilis. The cold hardiness alone makes this a fantastic bamboo. Looking forward to seeing more of it


no not yet but id like to see there mother plant. the only two Bambusa i think will grow here for me are multiplex varieties and textilis varieties. Though we can get into the teens once or twice a year some years are biggest thing here is it can freeze anytime from October through May and from mid November thru April most nights are close to or below freezing. i would like to try more varieties if anyone knows of any
:)

While winter hardiness is certainly multifactorial, and results will vary, I can say that Bambusa chungii has shown hardiness just slightly behind that of Bambusa textilis, at least in the Houston area. I am really just not experienced with your West Coast climate zones, but if B. textilis keeps most of its leaves through most of your winters, I think B. chungii is worth trying on an experimental basis.

Also, while there seems to be no discussion about this species, Bambusa distegia has shown some promise for me. It went through 22 degrees F last winter with no more damage than B. textilis or B. multiplex. This was a cold snap after weeks of extremely warm weather. Many normally hardy plants in this area were killed because of the extreme temperature swing. This species has not produced many culms, but it has gained size rapidly. I hope to post more about this species once I have more experience with it.



I have also had similar experiences with B. Chungii. Here in central Florida it drops into the 20’s on occasion and we get frost at least a few days every winter. My Chungii has always done well. If it’s not as hardy as the Textilis is pretty close. Certainly worth a try. I’d even give D. Minor ‘amoenus’ a try. It’s such a quick species to size up that if you start with a decent 15 gallon in early spring, water and fertilize properly, you can end with with a good sized mature specimen by summers end. Provided you have good soil. None of mine have been through one of our colder winters but I’m sure it’s coming. No damage to speak of from last winter. I don’t remember the lowest temps but I’m sure we had mild frost

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 11:39 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 3:38 am
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Location: Placerville California
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
We will probably have 75 days with lows below freezing if averages hold. Sunset garden book zone wordage is spot on . Mild but pronounced winters. I'll be checking those 2 out though

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Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Placerville Ca
Elevation 3000 ft
Zone 8B ( probably 8A )


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