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PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2019 5:20 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 09, 2019 5:10 am
Posts: 3
Location: Melbourne
I'm in Australia (winter at the moment) and in winter it doesn't entirely frost over, but can dip into single digits, but above freezing. Last two seasons, my bamboo (textilis gracilis) has been shooting in late Autumn and well into winter. The shoots produced last season were not great; some rotted/could be broken off and the height growth was not as good as previous seasons (the plant is about 4 years). This season, it seems that some of the shoots seem to be doing a bit better at surviving the cold as I've mulched heavier and there is lots of rain at the moment.

My question is, why does the bamboo first of all shoot so late when usually it happens in spring and is there a way to stop it from happening? Did I not fertilise it properly and hence why it isn't shooting when it is supposed to? We did also have two very dry springs/summers so I'm not sure if that is the reason that it didn't start shooting until the autumn rains. Secondly, is it bad for the bamboo to shoot in winter as from last season the shoots do not look great.

I appreciate your input and your past experience and expertise!


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2019 7:51 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 5:28 am
Posts: 289
Location: Southeast Texas, Zone 9a
That species is definitely adapted to summer rainfall. If moisture is not sufficient during spring through fall, it can delay shooting. I suspect that is what is happening to your plants. Lack of fertilizer could play a role, but moisture is probably the controlling factor here. Are your plants getting enough fertilizer to stay dark green? If not, I would recommend more fertilizer.

If possible, provide irrigation and keep the plants well watered during all warm parts of the year.

Very late shoots definitely can get damaged or stunted. The damage to those shoots is permanent. However, the damage will not affect the plants long-term. In years of sufficient warm season water, the plants should produce normal shoots again.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2019 1:37 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 09, 2019 5:10 am
Posts: 3
Location: Melbourne
Thanks Glen, they two summers have definitely been very dry so I believe water is the problem. I've tried to manually water as well but probably not enough by the looks of it. Hopefully the delayed season doesn't compound the issue more I.e. make next shooting season even later given it should be the usual shooting season soon, however my shoots are still growing.

I'll make sure to fertilise regularly and give them a top up of water as well :)


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 1:51 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 09, 2019 5:10 am
Posts: 3
Location: Melbourne
Glen wrote:
That species is definitely adapted to summer rainfall. If moisture is not sufficient during spring through fall, it can delay shooting. I suspect that is what is happening to your plants. Lack of fertilizer could play a role, but moisture is probably the controlling factor here. Are your plants getting enough fertilizer to stay dark green? If not, I would recommend more fertilizer.

If possible, provide irrigation and keep the plants well watered during all warm parts of the year.

Very late shoots definitely can get damaged or stunted. The damage to those shoots is permanent. However, the damage will not affect the plants long-term. In years of sufficient warm season water, the plants should produce normal shoots again.


Thank you, What you say makes sense, it was a very dry season last summer and although I've tried to top it up with some watering that probably is not enough. I did fertilise in spring but I'll also keep an eye out as well. Meanwhile I might try to feed the growing shoots now and see if it will continue growing into spring to become this year's shoot crops instead!


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2019 9:52 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 11:26 pm
Posts: 797
Location: plus 700ft in the Santa Cruz Mtns, 8 miles from the Pacific 35 miles S. of San Jose
Although my runners shoot in spring, my tropical clumpers all shoot in late fall early winter even though that is the coldest part of my California year. Stunting on my plants is primarily due to the strong winds that accompany heavy winter rain storms and break off new shoots. I try to grow my tropicals in protected areas. I'm guessing that the shooting of tropicals is genetically controlled. Rgds


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2019 11:11 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
Posts: 4669
Location: Esparto, CA
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Most of mine have been shooting for a couple weeks or are just starting to shoot, these are still juvenile or semi-so (though some approaching or exceeding 2" diameter) and may be shooting early due to that.

_________________
Brad Salmon, zone 9 Esparto, CA
www.needmorebamboo.com


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