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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2017 8:32 pm 
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Location: Estonia
Greetings people. I have about 25 Plants of Phyllostachys aureosulcata or otherwise known as Yellow Groove Bamboo that I started from seeds. But to be honest, I'm not very sure, if this is the right species or not so that's why I'm asking you guys here.
Here are some details of the bamboo:
All seeds were planted at the same time
the oldest one is 1 month and 5 days old.
the youngest one is about few weeks old.
about 25 out of 84 seeds germinated.
the oldest one is currently 16-17cm tall and has 4 leaves.
And the most importand thing. Pictures: http://bamboogrower.deviantart.com/art/ ... -662934039


I hope you guys are able to identify the species.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2017 9:55 pm 
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Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
It's too early to tell what bamboo you are growing. It's most likely not Phyllostachys aureosulcata, because they don't flower and Chinese vendors on eBay love to make up random name or use an existing one. Do you have a photo of the seeds? How large were the seeds and what was their shape?

I would say it is most likely Moso bamboo, but, like I said, it's way to early to tell. Grow them a couple of years and things may become more evident, especially if it's Moso.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2017 11:22 pm 
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Location: Estonia
Tarzanus wrote:
It's too early to tell what bamboo you are growing. It's most likely not Phyllostachys aureosulcata, because they don't flower and Chinese vendors on eBay love to make up random name or use an existing one. Do you have a photo of the seeds? How large were the seeds and what was their shape?

I would say it is most likely Moso bamboo, but, like I said, it's way to early to tell. Grow them a couple of years and things may become more evident, especially if it's Moso.



Well, I don't have a photo of the seeds but they looked like bamboo seeds are supposed to look like. I'm not very sure about the size of the seeds either (I think it was an inch or so) . But ohwell, this might not be exactly that species but I suppose it's okay as long as it is still bamboo. That's the most important thing to me.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:06 am 
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Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
It's definitely bamboo. Good luck :)

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 3:13 pm 
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Aureosulcata as Tarzanus said it unlikely to be correct, that species does randomly flower but does not seem to produce seed often. Another bamboo that has a yellow groove and did flower not so long ago was Phyllostachys arcana 'Luteosulcata'. Tarzanus has seedlings from that so he might recognize your seed if you have pictures of them before germinating. It looks like Aureosulcata so that might be what you have? In any case do not expect it to have yellow grooves in the next generation, it may but that is not so likely.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 3:42 pm 
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Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
If it's in fact Phyllostachys arcana 'Luteosulcata', I might be able to ID it as it grows from your seedling's photos. In a couple of years, perhaps we'll both have plants with shoots that will be easily identified. I know my seedlings are from 'Luteosulcata' mother plant, we'll see about yours.

Regarding the yellow groove... There are thousands of seedlings growing here in Europe, no one from Germany, Austria or France have seen any culm variegation so far. I do have 3 variegated seedlings and culm color seem to be different on one of them (somewhat milky green/brown colour that gets red-ish in bright light), but not one has shown any sulcus colouration. I hope that seedling recovers soon, because I really want to learn about culm colour.

I have a bunch of photos of that bamboo. From seeds to young plants that hardly sprouted and further on. I try to snap them in all stages of their development.

Here's the first post with pictures of seeds and germination
https://cold-hardy.com/growing-phyllost ... rom-seeds/

Whole bunch of posts about the variegated and non-variegated seedlings using search...
https://cold-hardy.com/?s=luteosulcata

Don't be fooled, most (all?) of Phyllostachys bamboo seedlings look almost identical during the early stages of development. With time, they start showing more and more unique features and that's when we can ID them. Final ID can usually be declared when the plant starts shooting adult shoots. In 5 years and more.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 1:19 pm 
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Location: Estonia
Tarzanus wrote:
If it's in fact Phyllostachys arcana 'Luteosulcata', I might be able to ID it as it grows from your seedling's photos. In a couple of years, perhaps we'll both have plants with shoots that will be easily identified. I know my seedlings are from 'Luteosulcata' mother plant, we'll see about yours.

Regarding the yellow groove... There are thousands of seedlings growing here in Europe, no one from Germany, Austria or France have seen any culm variegation so far. I do have 3 variegated seedlings and culm color seem to be different on one of them (somewhat milky green/brown colour that gets red-ish in bright light), but not one has shown any sulcus colouration. I hope that seedling recovers soon, because I really want to learn about culm colour.

I have a bunch of photos of that bamboo. From seeds to young plants that hardly sprouted and further on. I try to snap them in all stages of their development.

Here's the first post with pictures of seeds and germination
https://cold-hardy.com/growing-phyllost ... rom-seeds/

Whole bunch of posts about the variegated and non-variegated seedlings using search...
https://cold-hardy.com/?s=luteosulcata

Don't be fooled, most (all?) of Phyllostachys bamboo seedlings look almost identical during the early stages of development. With time, they start showing more and more unique features and that's when we can ID them. Final ID can usually be declared when the plant starts shooting adult shoots. In 5 years and more.



Thanks for the inf dude.! I guess, everything is just a matter of time now. But at least I know that what I have, is indeed bamboo. I'm using it as my school project to prove that it IS possible to grow bamboo here in Estonia. If everything goes well, one day I might be able to go to my forest and see bamboo plants all around.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 1:35 pm 
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It is possible to grow it. Winters may be a bit cold, but there are many bamboo varieties that will grow just fine. If indeed it is Phyllostachys arcana 'Luteosulcata' seedling you have there, then it might be able to survive. I have noticed my seedlings were almost indestructible when it comes to cold hardiness. I did however lose some of them this winter because of drought.

Good luck with your project

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 9:28 pm 
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Location: Estonia
Tarzanus wrote:
It is possible to grow it. Winters may be a bit cold, but there are many bamboo varieties that will grow just fine. If indeed it is Phyllostachys arcana 'Luteosulcata' seedling you have there, then it might be able to survive. I have noticed my seedlings were almost indestructible when it comes to cold hardiness. I did however lose some of them this winter because of drought.

Good luck with your project



Yeah, I'm quite aware of the cold hardy bamboos. But I have just one more question. Assuming this indeed is Phyllostachys arcana Luteosulcata, what can I use it's canes for? How strong are they and are there any parts of this bamboo that are edible? The internet didn't provide an answer to these questions so I thought, you might know this stuff.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 9:49 pm 
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Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
I'm not sure about the seedlings, their characteristics may vary, but if you check Phyllostachys arcana, you should roughly know what to expect.
If one would make a card game with stats (I loved to play those in my early years :mrgreen: ) they would look something like this:
Height 5 to 6 meters, max. 8m in optimal conditions
Culm diameter up to 4 centimeters
Cold hardiness down to -22°C

Phyllostachys bamboos usually have edible shoots, I have no idea about the quality and taste of P. arcana shoots, but you can try when the time comes. You will have culms that may be useful in whole bunch of DIY projects. They will most likely be too thin to build something larger, but I think they are extremely useful in your garden. I'm not sure about how thick walls will it have or how hard the wood would end up being. You have to grow it and see. That's the best/worst thing about seedlings - you have no clue about what you'll get in the end. :D

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 6:08 am 
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Location: Estonia
Tarzanus wrote:
I'm not sure about the seedlings, their characteristics may vary, but if you check Phyllostachys arcana, you should roughly know what to expect.
If one would make a card game with stats (I loved to play those in my early years :mrgreen: ) they would look something like this:
Height 5 to 6 meters, max. 8m in optimal conditions
Culm diameter up to 4 centimeters
Cold hardiness down to -22°C

Phyllostachys bamboos usually have edible shoots, I have no idea about the quality and taste of P. arcana shoots, but you can try when the time comes. You will have culms that may be useful in whole bunch of DIY projects. They will most likely be too thin to build something larger, but I think they are extremely useful in your garden. I'm not sure about how thick walls will it have or how hard the wood would end up being. You have to grow it and see. That's the best/worst thing about seedlings - you have no clue about what you'll get in the end. :D


Well, I suppose things are in the hands of time. Tis' indeed a mystery what I have. But no matter what bamboo I have, I'll grow it.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 1:32 pm 
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Location: HALIFAX, NS
"Cold hardiness down to -22°C"

Inland in Nova Scotia P. arcana froze to the snowline with one night to -20c. Subsequent culms after the inevitable cold snap inland results in 2.5m culms, rather light for good stout stakes.

john

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 5:43 pm 
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Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
Johnw, I've taken that info from German bamboo info source (http://www.bambus-lexikon.de/phyllostachys-arcana.html). We did not have temperatures that low.
We did however see low temps around -15°C (perhaps colder) and 'deep freeze' phase that lasted about two months. By 'deep freeze' I mean temperatures remained below freezing during the day, and there was no snow to insulate the ground. I can't speak for Luteosulcata, because I decided to place them into the basement before the hardest weather struck, but I can easily say the seedlings may be just as hardy as Phyllostachys aureosulcata 'Spectabilis'. I've had pots frozen solid for nearly a month, before I finally brought them inside. Some were really tiny seedlings which suffered dry soil, not the cold. I have a couple of seedlings planted inside under clear PVC cover. Those were also completely frozen, garlic, growing next to them had not even started until recently. Well, the leaves on those couple of seedlings are damage free. Leaves thickened considerably and there's a waxy substance on them, but they don't even have their tips burnt.

I will try to plant them somewhere outside in the open this year. It will be interesting to see how they can handle the cold. Perhaps seedlings are even more hardy? Perhaps they need to go fully dormant to become hardy enough? I have no idea, all I know is that I'm quite impressed by their hardiness. So far..

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 9:47 pm 
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Arcana type in-ground would generally hold up well for me to -15C and then crap out beyond -18C.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:49 pm 
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Guys, I did some research about phyllostachys arcana luteosulcata seedlings and I found some pictures about a couple weeks old seedlings. Compared them to my couple weeks old seedlings and they kinda looked different. I think, once my seedlings are about 3 months old, it will be possible to identify it's species.


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