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 Post subject: Rare clumpers
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 2:41 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 20, 2013 3:48 pm
Posts: 231
Location: Comox,BC
Hey everyone.

I am not sure if I’m able to advertise on here ( I have been a long term memeber) but I have made a few divisions of some rare bamboos I could sell

Borinda Kr 5287
Borinda Kr 7613
Fargesia jiuzhaigou ‘deep purple’
Phyllostachys nigra variegated ( TC plant from overseas )

I would be willing to trade for rare edulis and I’m not to sure on prices as of yet either. I’m not so sure if any of these are offered for sale yet in NA.

Plants would be very small. Able to ship by spring.


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 Post subject: Re: Rare clumpers
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 3:33 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 3:38 am
Posts: 404
Location: Emmett Idaho
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
the fargesia sounds neat do you know how hardy that one is?

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Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Emmett Idaho
Zone 7A
Potato country


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 Post subject: Re: Rare clumpers
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 3:50 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 20, 2013 3:48 pm
Posts: 231
Location: Comox,BC
Cooper12,

It’s as hardy as the other nitida I would imagine. For sure Z7


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 Post subject: Re: Rare clumpers
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 2:30 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
Posts: 4691
Location: Esparto, CA
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Cooper12, I think that Leo gave great advice here recently regarding growing Fargesia, it was the same advice I had received and ignored years earlier. In particular the soil PH, keep that in mind at your new z6 if you get them, I suspect it enhances hardiness.

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Brad Salmon, zone 9 Esparto, CA
www.needmorebamboo.com


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 Post subject: Re: Rare clumpers
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:05 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 3:38 am
Posts: 404
Location: Emmett Idaho
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
needmore wrote:
Cooper12, I think that Leo gave great advice here recently regarding growing Fargesia, it was the same advice I had received and ignored years earlier. In particular the soil PH, keep that in mind at your new z6 if you get them, I suspect it enhances hardiness.



I read something about slightly acidic soil which I could definitely see especially anything native to coniferous forests.
I will have to check the soil as I am not sure what its like though being grassland and sage brush I wouldn't think so but I could amend the soil.
On another note it seems to be listed as a 7A zone but it can get below zero ( I have read from every few years to once a decade ) so maybe the more often depends on the microclimate as 6B zones are near by in the valley .

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Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Emmett Idaho
Zone 7A
Potato country


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 Post subject: Re: Rare clumpers
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:26 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 1:28 pm
Posts: 1616
Location: HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA
Bamboo Society Membership: EBS - Germany
F. nitida is perfectly hardy here in Nova Scotia Z6 and I have seen it thriving in Z5 to our north in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. Cool summers, especially cool nights, are imperative.

johnw

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johnw coastal Nova Scotia


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 Post subject: Re: Rare clumpers
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 6:50 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 3:38 am
Posts: 404
Location: Emmett Idaho
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
johnw wrote:
F. nitida is perfectly hardy here in Nova Scotia Z6 and I have seen it thriving in Z5 to our north in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. Cool summers, especially cool nights, are imperative.

johnw

Most do well at my place now as far as fargesia. They really need shade but the heat doesn’t bother them . We have low humidity and nights are usually mild

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Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Emmett Idaho
Zone 7A
Potato country


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 Post subject: Re: Rare clumpers
PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:00 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 9:48 pm
Posts: 86
Location: NE Illinois, zone 5, USA
Yep, my advice on Fargesia, is for a relatively deep, say at least 6 inches to 12 inches or more of well composted bark with some peat moss, & lawn clippings blended in. It is not ''just a pH issue'', in that it is probably more than just an acidic chemical reaction that Fargesia require. Pure pumice would be mildly acidic, and I am certain that Fargesia would hate pure pumice. A media rich in organic material is needed. Composted bark is ideal.

My family (cousins) own a blueberry farm, and the recommended media for growing containerized blueberries is 70% composted bark, 25% Canadian peat moss and 5% hardwood sawdust. In blueberries the sawdust is to feed the endo-mycorrhiza associated with blueberries. I have no scientific proof but I would not be surprised if there were endo-mycorrhiza associated with Fargesia, possibly different species of mycorrhiza than those involved with blueberries, but the possibility exists. Many species of plants from forest habitats do require an organic media.

Most conifer nurseries use composted fir bark as their main ingredient for their containerized conifers, this is an easy media to obtain or create yourself. Some wood chips likely would not hurt if they had 12 months or more of composting before being added to the bed with the fargesia.

You can buy raw bark chips for landscaping, get the plain without added color or dyes. Compost them for a year, or prepare your bed a year in advance, then use the bark chips for Fargesia media. For pot or container culture avoid a high percentage of wood in the bark mix. (Some, 5 - 10 % is likely okay)

Wood, composting wood chips, especially if composted more than 12 months, are perfectly okay for use in beds with contact to the local native soil. Not so good for containers. In blueberry beds, a yearly addition of about 4 inches of wood chips is appropriate. This would mean that after a decade of yearly additions, the bed has been built up with a foot or more of rich, well composted wood chips and bark. The wood in addition to the bark keeps the soil acidic.

Wood chips, chipped tree limbs from clearing brush are perfectly good for this purpose if composted for a year. The first year the wood chips have a very high nitrogen demand, this tapers off after the first year. Add a dose or two of fertilizer to your compost pile to accelerate the composting process. Or just let nature take its course.


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