BAMBOOWEB.INFO
It is currently Wed Dec 19, 2018 5:48 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Sep 23, 2017 5:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
Posts: 4622
Location: Esparto, CA
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
A potential new place we're pursuing looks to have a bit of a micro-climate in one area as I see a neglected bird of paradise trying to flower and those are not so hardy I think?

In any case I have two cold sensitive Bambusa and want another couple plus a Dendrocalamus. I'd guess my winter would be like the FL panhandle or maybe a tad farther south, solid zone 9 that will get a few light freezes of a few hours duration, last winter 29 was the low but it will go colder than that.

I already have the first 2 on this list and want the second 2, anyone have an idea which would likely be the most cold sensitive and need the best micro climate? Also any other sub tropical clumpers I'm not considering that have unusual culm characteristics?

Already have:
B eutuldoides 'Viridivittata'
B pervariabilis 'Viridistriatta'

Plan to get:
B chungii
D minor 'Amoenis'

_________________
Brad Salmon, zone 9 Esparto, CA
www.needmorebamboo.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:49 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:06 pm
Posts: 124
Location: Magnolia Springs, Al Zone 8b
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
I'm in zone 8B and we had three days of 21 degrees this winter, which was the first winter my B Chungii got in the ground. Planted May 20, 2016. I also had 3 gal pots that didn't do as well. I managed to save 2 of 5 I had purchased after planting in ground. I don't want to totally blame the winter for their demise, because I did transplant them into 7 gallon pots and the root ball was a bit too immature.

B Chungii in the ground had a few culms burned at the top, but has been the best producer of new culms. Of course when I planted the 3 gal it was a twig, but now (16 months later) its about 18' and very full.

The B Mutabilis (Emerald) I planted at the same time looks awesome. I expected the Kanapaha to do even better, but the growth was a bit more erratic but comparable in height. About 23' now for both species.

_________________
My Purpose for God http://LegacyWillandTrust.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:51 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 1:20 am
Posts: 99
Location: Lithia Florida
Brad, I've got about 15 large clumps of Chungii that tolerated light frost for about 5-6 hours last season with no problems at all. I'm guessing the temps were around 28 or so. I'm in a solid 9a here in central Fla. We get frost every season. I've also got 5 large clumps of D. Minor A that did fine as well. Those are close to the house which might've helped. My birds of paradise (both orange and white) did just fine as well. I'm guessing smaller chungii and D. Minor might have suffered a bit more but the mature clumps did well.

_________________
-shu


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 1:28 pm
Posts: 1606
Location: HALIFAX, NS
Forwarding response from a duplicated folder:

But to answer your question, the D. Minor 'amoenus' will need the most protection without a doubt. The B. Chungii is more cold tolerant. If you lived closer I'd give you a division of B. Eutoldoides 'viridivittata' inversa next season. I'll have a few divisions early next summer.

_________________
-shu

_________________
johnw coastal Nova Scotia


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 2:08 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
Posts: 4622
Location: Esparto, CA
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Good info all thanx, the Amoenus is what I'd want in the most protected area anyway so that syncs nicely. I'm surprised how tough it is for me to find that and Chungii in CA, I can mail order from Robert of course but was hoping for larger starter plants. The only Chungii I've found is $150 5 gal, $250 15 gal :shock:

_________________
Brad Salmon, zone 9 Esparto, CA
www.needmorebamboo.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 1:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 1:20 am
Posts: 99
Location: Lithia Florida
needmore wrote:
Good info all thanx, the Amoenus is what I'd want in the most protected area anyway so that syncs nicely. I'm surprised how tough it is for me to find that and Chungii in CA, I can mail order from Robert of course but was hoping for larger starter plants. The only Chungii I've found is $150 5 gal, $250 15 gal :shock:


I see that a lot here too. Some nurseries, especially the ones that don't normally sell bamboo, charge these insane prices for bamboo. Many of which are misidentified or full of mealy bugs, or both. My only rational is that they paid retail so they have to mark the plants up to make a profit. Sometimes I'll find a place that has a fairly rare species, and doesn't know it, priced cheap and that's always a bonus. But the latter is few and far in between. $150 for a 5 gallon is hard to swallow. I guess it's because it's harder to produce smaller B. Chungii as it doesn't propagate from cuttings to well, if at all. I've heard of various ways to produce smaller Chungii but I have yet to try it. For me, it's just easier to make divisions from larger specimens after I cut the bulk of the culm off. I've heard of various ways to air layer or even to bury a larger plant and wait till it produces smaller shoots(which is how I suspect Robert does it). Hopefully next spring I can start to trial and error myself into success. I've propagated several B. Oldhamii and a ton of B. Vulgaris, B. Vulgaris 'vittata' and B. Vulgaris 'wamin' from cuttings when I lived closer to the beach. Aside from the B. Oldhamii the other species aren't cold hardy enough to survive my winter lows since we moved to the middle of the state. I now have much more property but in a zone lower. Next spring I've got a lot of propagating to do.

_________________
-shu


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 1:35 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 1:20 am
Posts: 99
Location: Lithia Florida
Also, if you do have to start your Chungii or D. Minor from smaller plants, they both explode with new shoots faster than just about any other clumpers. From 3 gallon to monsters in 2-3 seasons under great conditions isn't unusual. Good luck and keep us posted....

_________________
-shu


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 2:23 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
Posts: 4622
Location: Esparto, CA
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
As usual impatience is the issue, I would have a focal point to plant next to the front door in a protected area and I thin the Amoenus with the larger leaves would be ideal but I'll have to wait to size up a mail order plant first before it is a focal plant. Impatience may lead to me planting one of the yellow Bambusa I've already got going. If I thought the Parker would not flower it would be the one but I still expect it to.

_________________
Brad Salmon, zone 9 Esparto, CA
www.needmorebamboo.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 8:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:13 pm
Posts: 2843
Location: St. Louis area Location Details
Doesn't matter the zone, Brad loves pushing those hardiness ratings. :wink:

("I guess we all do really though", he says as he pulls the last few nigra rhizomes out of the bed...

_________________
Alan.
My blog: It's not work, it's gardening!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 1:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
Posts: 4622
Location: Esparto, CA
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Don't ya just hate the thought of potentially wasting a micro-climate area :albino:

_________________
Brad Salmon, zone 9 Esparto, CA
www.needmorebamboo.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2017 2:07 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 3:38 am
Posts: 382
Location: Placerville California
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
I hope you try Lako :o

_________________
Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Placerville Ca
Elevation 3000 ft
Zone 8B ( probably 8A )


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2017 10:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 11:26 pm
Posts: 761
Location: plus 700ft in the Santa Cruz Mtns, 8 miles from the Pacific 35 miles S. of San Jose
I'm on 3rd attempt at chungii. It's currently doing good. Based upon my observations: 1) Location, location. 2) Critter candy - protection a must, 3) Will shoot late in year just as temps fall. New shoots need protection. 4) Appears not to be frost hardy but not sure, 5) takes a long time to adapt to new conditions. Get local stock if you want faster results. Bottom line - price probably high because it is not as tolerant to conditions as other bambusa's. My clone X was planted at the same time (same area) and is doing better. I like different stuff and clone X delivers with less attention. I'm into survival of fittest mode. You have seen my place and I'm sure you understand. Rgds


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 3:20 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 3:38 am
Posts: 382
Location: Placerville California
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Fred, do you think with chungii it's more so the amount of cold nights as opposed to the actual absolute lows? I've heard a few times now it takes upper teens with no damage low teens with top kill but recovery. I debated trying it since multiplex and textilis varieties live here but am concerned as in the areas I heard about Chungii taking it that cold have only occasional cold snaps while here we have numerous mornings in the 20s during the winter

_________________
Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Placerville Ca
Elevation 3000 ft
Zone 8B ( probably 8A )


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 6:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 11:26 pm
Posts: 761
Location: plus 700ft in the Santa Cruz Mtns, 8 miles from the Pacific 35 miles S. of San Jose
I'm not sure re the number of days issue. Ditto re issue of frost, especially hard frost. All of the chungii that I have planted have been one culm, not very mature, probably more prone to low temps and heavy frost than mature plants. I don't get many days below mid-20's in total but they do come two or three days at a time. The other issue is that I have abt 3 different eco zones in close proximity. I get no frost in some and heavy frost in others plus temps can very. Rgds


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group