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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2010 10:54 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 11:26 pm
Posts: 726
Location: plus 700ft in the Santa Cruz Mtns, 8 miles from the Pacific 35 miles S. of San Jose
Kyoto National University study 1951-1985
1. The longest study & most complete study applied to cultivated bamboo.
2. Optimum yields re chemical applications - 20-15-20 (Nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus), two times a year.
3) Organic - best composted manure was cow manure placed over rice straw.
4) Mulch - leaf litter and rice straw for 3 seasons then a layer of red clay.

Handbook from a class on growing bamboo at the University of California Santa Cruz that I attended. Rgds


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 6:13 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 22, 2009 10:58 pm
Posts: 79
Location: Seattle and Wenatchee, WA
Karl Bareis is the author of Handbook for Growing Bamboo? Do you know when the handbook was published, and what Karl Bareis' background is?


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 1:42 pm 
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Location: plus 700ft in the Santa Cruz Mtns, 8 miles from the Pacific 35 miles S. of San Jose
The handbook was distributed at the class that I took on growing bamboo on the central coast of California. I think I took the class at UCSC in 1997.
Karl has taught the class several times at UCSC and at ABS functions. He has been a officer of the Northern Chapter a couple of times. Karl went to Japan to study carpentry several years ago. I believe he lived there about 8 years or so. He developed an interest in bamboo while he was there and studied techniques for growing it as well as using it for arts and crafts. He has taught many classes on using bamboo for arts/crafts. He developed a relationship with a university in China
that teaches bamboo cultivation. He brought one of the foremost professors to the US in the mid-90's.
Karl also knows Chris Stapleton quite well. I met Chris when he visited Karl in the late 90's. Karl has made several trips to the mtns in China and has helped bring many of the mountain bamboo species into the US. He has been a consultant to at least one bamboo nursery that I know of (Bamboo Giant).
I believe they may have been one of the first to extensively use wood chips. Rgds


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 04, 2010 4:35 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2009 11:56 pm
Posts: 362
Location: Dallas, Texas (zone 8)
One big red flag. Different soils require different fertilizers. There is a difference between good data and good science, and one must look at the fertilzer comment as an observation rather than a recommendation. The percents dont seem to come even close to the percents of what a plant typically utilzes...

Regards,
Mackel in DFW


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:50 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 11:26 pm
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Location: plus 700ft in the Santa Cruz Mtns, 8 miles from the Pacific 35 miles S. of San Jose
Good post. I agree. My guess is that much of Japan's soil is on top of a volcanic base. Rgds


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