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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 2:05 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:50 am
Posts: 3
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Sorry to be the newbie. I searched the forum so as not to be that guy who restarts the same threads.

I live in Salt Lake City on the valley floor at 7b hardiness at best. I want a bamboo that will create a thick, tall screen, but also be useful as timber and possibly for eating new shoots. I don't want to deal with running varieties, I've got too much going on with my garden to be worrying about a takeover. Any help is very appreciated.

Thank you,

Eric


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:04 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
Posts: 4689
Location: Esparto, CA
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Not really, you'd have to go with a running form. The hardiest clumpers I'm aware of with any size will tolerate a brief, rare spell in the upper teens but prolonged/frequent below freezing temps will surely knock them down.

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Brad Salmon, zone 9 Esparto, CA
www.needmorebamboo.com


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 4:52 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:50 am
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Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Thanks for the information. I may have to swallow my fear of running bamboo and just do the best I can to make sure that it doesn't spread. I was really hoping for a low maintenance, visual barrier, but I guess that growing something that I can use to build and to eat, as well as providing a privacy screen is worth the extra effort of containing the invasive beast.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 3:15 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 3:38 am
Posts: 401
Location: Emmett Idaho
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
I live at 3000 ft in Northern California and can not get any to grow here. just the shorter Borinda and Fargesia for the most part .
I've seen Fargesia robusta too maybe 15 ft. it is rated to zone 7 but at that zone i don't think it would be near that size.
The other thing where you are is its very dry and still gets quite hot in the summer with cold dry winter winds. In Reno and Boise the hardy clumpers like Fargesia nitida and rufa need protection from drying winter wind and afternoon summer shade is a must. Here where I am in the lower Sierra my Fargesia rufra and Scabrida do fine in the sun with mulch on the roots but we do not get the extreme low summer humidity and dry winter winds.

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Jason Floyd
Hangtown Farms

Emmett Idaho
Zone 7A
Potato country


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 7:48 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 22, 2017 6:34 am
Posts: 4
Location: Canada
Hey aireque_slc, I see the main part of your question has already been answered. However there are hardy timbers that do run less than others. I would suggest based on your zone that you go with some kind of Phyllostachys aureosulcata. They don't run as much, and in a zone 7 you will see some nice sized canes, plus P. aureosulcata have an incredibly tropical look! Also it is worth noting that you can contain your Timber Bamboo's with yearly or twice yearly root pruning.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 11:22 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 12:28 am
Posts: 1216
Location: Island off Cape Cod Massacusetts
In zone 7 P aureosulcata gets around as quickly as anything else, except P bissetti. I do agree it looks great and gets to full size. Regular yellow groove and alata seem to be faster then spectabilis, aureocaulis is even a bit slower, at least here.

I would nominate P nuda as one of the slower runners. Then there are the ones that may not be slow, but tend to get knocked back by winter kill, but that is something else, and perhaps even more location specific.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 3:01 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 1:28 pm
Posts: 1616
Location: HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA
Bamboo Society Membership: EBS - Germany
Here in Z6 P. aureosulcata is a notorious runner. I would presume in your Z7 it would go rather wild.

Though root hardy in Z6 it can, like all the aureosulcatas, get badly damaged by brief temps of -4F and lower. We've seen some dead leaves at brief lows of 0 to 4F. None of the Phyllo spp. are thoroughly reliable in a cold winter, one which still rates within the limits of a true Z6 - (0 to -10F). Oft quoted ratings of aureosulcata of -29F are simply preposterous.

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johnw coastal Nova Scotia


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 3:17 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 16, 2011 12:05 am
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Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
P. aureosulcata is also not the best when it comes to the quality of wood. Culm walls are rather thin and not the strongest.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 4:41 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 10:09 am
Posts: 248
Location: Austria
You may want to consider phyllostachys parvifolia.

It is quite cold hardy, has pretty solid culms, can get rather tall, usually does not run as much as most phyllostachys (but also tends to grow a bit slower because of this) , and has side branches that go quite low down the culm even on more mature plants if you want it for privacy.

all the best,

Nicholas


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 10:05 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:50 am
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Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Wow, what a great community! Thanks for all your help folks!

Eric


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 6:00 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 22, 2017 6:34 am
Posts: 4
Location: Canada
You guys are right, I'm not sure what I was thinking while answering before... P. aureosulcata isn't exactly whats being asked for, especially for decent timber.

Upon review of the question, I think a better pick if you wanted wood quality and a somewhat less aggressive runner, i'd lean towards something like P. nigra 'Othello'. We've been growing it for awhile and the wood quality is like other P. nigra's, but it's shown itself to be overall smaller with canes closer together.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 1:09 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 27, 2011 7:18 pm
Posts: 380
Location: Toronto (north)
The issue with parvifolia is that it looks bushy with culms leaning all over the place for the first few years. You may not get the straight thick culms until maybe the 5th or 6th year after planting.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 5:23 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 1:28 pm
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Location: HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA
Bamboo Society Membership: EBS - Germany
How did P. parvifolia fare in the bad winters you had in Toronto back in 2014 - 2016? We have big ones circa 12-15ft here but still not in the ground, going to be trouble when they shoot this year.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 10:25 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 26, 2017 6:38 pm
Posts: 11
Location: UK
My Fargesia Robusta Campbell clumper is very rampant, much more than my other Fargesias, super tall, thick screen, and we've had some bad winters here in the UK with temps dropping below zero, lowest recorded temp -8*c in recent years, and these are followed by ice days. Robusta always stays green and lush.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2017 7:21 am 
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Joined: Wed Apr 26, 2017 6:38 pm
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Location: UK
One thing missing from the Robusta Campbell I guess is the timber aspect you asking for :lol:


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