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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 2016 6:46 am 
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Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 9:07 pm
Posts: 33
Location: Gulf Shores, Alabama
Danny says there's some large Oldhamii in Pensacola down around Bayou Texar I think is what he told me. Said it must be so healthy because it's right on the water and in the right place shielded from the North wind. Hope this helps.


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2016 3:45 am 
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Location: Magnolia Springs, Al Zone 8b
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
I'm guessing Old Ham is out for me. I'm hoping to use the boo to block the North wind. Thanks for all the info.

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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Sat Feb 27, 2016 6:55 am 
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Location: Gulf Shores, Alabama
If we were one growing zone further south, I would bet it would make all the difference in the world, ha ha.


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Sat Feb 27, 2016 2:59 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:06 pm
Posts: 120
Location: Magnolia Springs, Al Zone 8b
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Yes it does. South Florida has some of the most beautiful landscaping I've ever seen. I guess I will just have to be happy with a select group of clumpers, but that is better than having to contain running bamboo from what I've seen first hand. It's no wonder bamboo has such a negative sentiment. After I started speaking to folks about it I learned how many were unaware of the clumping species and still very apprehensive about giving it a try.

I brought my pressure washer to a repair shop in Fairhope and noticed his running bamboo, it was obviously uncared for. He said the City had been battling it for years in the power lines and he had shoots coming up through the concrete in his shop. No Thank You.

Again, I'm happy we do have several clumping species that grow here and grow well. I'll work with those.

Tell me more about your kanapaha bamboo, what gal size did you start with? How long have they been in the ground? How tall? Diameter culms? Color?

Thanks for sharing your insight.

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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Mon Feb 29, 2016 1:36 am 
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Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 9:07 pm
Posts: 33
Location: Gulf Shores, Alabama
My Kanapaha is doing well and takes the cold well but I don't think I have anything at the 2.5" dia. so far. Maybe close to 2" and maybe 30 ft. tall but that's what I have after about 4 or 5 years of growing these boo's. Danny has some very nice stuff but I guess it takes more patience and dedication than I am giving it. But I don't think it has maxed out and still growing so who knows, hopefully it will continue getting larger. I know I can't get out of Danny's place without spending a pile of money, every time I go there, ha ha.


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Mon Feb 29, 2016 2:15 am 
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All the textilis varieties do very well here in 8b. Kanapaha is the largest cold hardy bamboo for this zone growing to about 45 feet and 2.3 inches thick. Also, all of the Bambusa multiplexes do well. None of these die back completely here and only some get leaf burn on the coldest of nights. Chungii(Blue Bamboo) and Oldhamii are about equally cold hardy to each other but not as cold hardy as other Bambusas, and some years they will freeze almost down to the ground. It was hard to see 4" culms killed off on my Oldhamii.
Bambusa eutuldoides 'Viridivittata' and Bambusa pervariabilis 'Viridistriatus' are a couple of my favorites but you may want to give them some winter protection and/or plant them in a wind protected area.


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Mon Feb 29, 2016 4:05 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:06 pm
Posts: 120
Location: Magnolia Springs, Al Zone 8b
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
hydroid wrote:
My Kanapaha is doing well and takes the cold well but I don't think I have anything at the 2.5" dia. so far. Maybe close to 2" and maybe 30 ft. tall but that's what I have after about 4 or 5 years of growing these boo's. Danny has some very nice stuff but I guess it takes more patience and dedication than I am giving it. But I don't think it has maxed out and still growing so who knows, hopefully it will continue getting larger. I know I can't get out of Danny's place without spending a pile of money, every time I go there, ha ha.


4 or 5yrs? Wow, I had it in my mind they mature in 3yrs. I did see some pics showing a much larger culm in Gainesville Fl, so maybe yours aren't done yet. I do have to wonder if our climate might hinder the potential other climates enjoy.

I know what you mean about going to see mature bamboo and getting very excited. My pocketbook has kept me restrained for now while I research the exact species I want to grow. Thank you for sharing your results.

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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Mon Feb 29, 2016 4:31 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:06 pm
Posts: 120
Location: Magnolia Springs, Al Zone 8b
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Kentuck wrote:
All the textilis varieties do very well here in 8b. Kanapaha is the largest cold hardy bamboo for this zone growing to about 45 feet and 2.3 inches thick. Also, all of the Bambusa multiplexes do well. None of these die back completely here and only some get leaf burn on the coldest of nights. Chungii(Blue Bamboo) and Oldhamii are about equally cold hardy to each other but not as cold hardy as other Bambusas, and some years they will freeze almost down to the ground. It was hard to see 4" culms killed off on my Oldhamii.
Bambusa eutuldoides 'Viridivittata' and Bambusa pervariabilis 'Viridistriatus' are a couple of my favorites but you may want to give them some winter protection and/or plant them in a wind protected area.


It would hurt my heart to see 4" culms die back, I feel ya. My place gets a strong North wind with no way of really providing protection. I am hoping the bamboo I get will be the wind block I want for my backyard. I've researched some species that can handle the wind better than others. Good tip on the Chungii and Oldhamii, I had ruled out the Oldhamii but not the Blue. Although I've seen a nice stand of Blue locally, it may be getting the wind protection you spoke of.

Have you ever seen any of this species before? I was really hoping for an impressive single specimen in my front yard.

"Bambusa ventricosa 'Clone X'
Vigorous large clumper with dark green culms. Extremely thick-walled culms with a slight zigzag and whitish bloom. This cultivar of tuldoides ventricosa has been dubbed Clone X as it grows larger, faster, and never produces swollen internodes. Clump diameter (footprint) can exceed 15' at maturity. 65' tall, 3" diameter culms, Minimum temp 15 degrees F. Min USDA zone: 8b."

Thanks for your comments.

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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Mon Feb 29, 2016 6:29 pm 
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My Oldhamii had no north protection either and got the full brunt of those cold northers here. I now planted a row of textilis to block the wind which has helped. I really like oldhamii and if you are lucky enough to get a couple of really mild winters in a row, then you should have some huge culms. Last Winter was one of our coldest ever, but the cold never lasted for very long so the oldhamii did not get very much damage, and this year, we really haven't had a winter so I am looking forward to some large culms once again.

Another thing about my textilis, outside of my original 'mother' plant, none have reached full size. I have taken dozens of divisions from the tall Kanapaha and they grow great but never get large. I think this may be due to where they are planted. The mother plant is in slight competition with other trees and bamboos but the transplants are mostly in the open where they reach about 35 feet max.

I have a CloneX that did extremely well in it's first year in the ground. From an overcrowded 3 gallon pot, in one year, it grew to over 20 feet with several new culms, but then it got burned back but has since recovered and should really put on a show this year. The only thing about the CloneX is, it leans outward a lot. It is not an erect plant but I've heard stories of it growing to 80 feet and I like the idea of the lower culms being almost solid so I can use them for many things. This will be the third year for it to be in the ground.


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Mon Feb 29, 2016 8:45 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 9:07 pm
Posts: 33
Location: Gulf Shores, Alabama
Ophiuchus, have you seen that moso at Bellingrath Gardens? I know it's a little off topic but if you've never been there you should go, especially in the spring when the azaleas are in bloom.


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2016 2:19 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:06 pm
Posts: 120
Location: Magnolia Springs, Al Zone 8b
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Kentuck wrote:
My Oldhamii had no north protection either and got the full brunt of those cold northers here. I now planted a row of textilis to block the wind which has helped. I really like oldhamii and if you are lucky enough to get a couple of really mild winters in a row, then you should have some huge culms. Last Winter was one of our coldest ever, but the cold never lasted for very long so the oldhamii did not get very much damage, and this year, we really haven't had a winter so I am looking forward to some large culms once again.

Another thing about my textilis, outside of my original 'mother' plant, none have reached full size. I have taken dozens of divisions from the tall Kanapaha and they grow great but never get large. I think this may be due to where they are planted. The mother plant is in slight competition with other trees and bamboos but the transplants are mostly in the open where they reach about 35 feet max.

I have a CloneX that did extremely well in it's first year in the ground. From an overcrowded 3 gallon pot, in one year, it grew to over 20 feet with several new culms, but then it got burned back but has since recovered and should really put on a show this year. The only thing about the CloneX is, it leans outward a lot. It is not an erect plant but I've heard stories of it growing to 80 feet and I like the idea of the lower culms being almost solid so I can use them for many things. This will be the third year for it to be in the ground.


Great information, thanks. That is strange your divisions didn't produce an exact replica of the mother plant. When you say divisions, I'm assuming you are cutting into the root ball. The grower I met in Miami made a point to mention that his propagation technique clones the mother plant exactly. It didn't register with me until you mentioned your results. He was propagating by actually cutting the culm down to the ground and stuffing three 18" - 24" canes into a 7 gal container filled with potting mix, without any other preparation. He has mixed success and that's why he plants 3 in each pot.

I like the idea of the CloneX for a single specimen, but you have me a little concerned about how much leaning they do. The spot I want to put it is between a mature Pecan tree and a young 25 ft Oak tree and it will get full North wind exposure coming off an open agricultural field. So I need to check it's wind tolerance. When I saw the growers write up that it withstands 15 degrees and has such large culms I got excited that it may be a great substitute for the Old Hamii.

The Kanapaha sounds a lot like the Emerald my wife fell in love with. I'm thinking I will need about 13 plants to create the tunneled driveway effect I'm looking for, so I really want to make the right decision.

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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2016 2:30 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:06 pm
Posts: 120
Location: Magnolia Springs, Al Zone 8b
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
hydroid wrote:
Ophiuchus, have you seen that moso at Bellingrath Gardens? I know it's a little off topic but if you've never been there you should go, especially in the spring when the azaleas are in bloom.


I have been there, but not in a long while and way before Bamboo was in my frame of reference. I would love to see the moso and will make it a point to get over there. Looky Looky, No Touchy Touchy running bamboo for me. LOL

I saw some giant clumping bamboo in Loxahatchee Fl and was just amazed, but as you know the routine, it won't survive further North than Orlando. Darn the bad luck.

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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2016 4:09 pm 
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Posts: 40
Ophiuchus, yes I do only rootball divisions when I propagate my bamboo. I have not had very much luck from culms or limbs. That is what puzzles me also. I have one division out in front of my house and it is just over 30 feet and has been there for over 12 years and it is in the same soil type. I have tried fertilizing it heavily but I see no change. Even a division that gave to a friend and is planted in another town has stayed smaller. I still think it is location and the competition for sunlight. I am planning on a driveway with textilis on both sides, forming a tunnel also. I take single culm divisions at this time of the year from the plant which have no limbs on them, just a culm cut off about 3 feet from the ground. By the end of the summer, they begin to put up new growth from the base and they are ready to plant next year.

The CloneX as I have heard, gets a little more erect as it gets older so I am hoping this is the case. It is the same cold hardy as my Oldhamii since they both freeze equally on colder nights.


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Thu Mar 03, 2016 12:58 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 3:38 am
Posts: 382
Location: Placerville California
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
id love clone x and oldhamii here in my 8B out west. i haven't tried clone x but Oldhamii gets torched . i may try growing it as a perennial one day

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Hangtown Farms

Placerville Ca
Elevation 3000 ft
Zone 8B ( probably 8A )


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie Zone 8b
PostPosted: Thu Mar 03, 2016 6:55 pm 
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Make sure to water your oldhamii and cloneX before a hard freeze. This will help make sure you keep it from getting frostbite. I have even watered the plant all night during a hard freeze to keep it from getting too cold, however this will not work on a tall plant and it will ice it over in some cases but the ice will not hurt the plant.


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