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PostPosted: Thu Jan 23, 2014 9:29 am 
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Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 10:09 am
Posts: 241
Location: Austria
If money isn't a problem I'd install the barrier (2mm hdpe, 1m width) right away when doing the fence.
Once it is properly installed you can forget about it for the next few decades.

Mowing down shoots works but at the same time you are still letting the rhizomes spread (from the neighbors side).
Eventually shoots will come up further and further into your property if the conditions there are more favourable.


[edit] Don't remove the rhizomes when installing a barrier. Just mow them down. Once the severed part has no more top growth it will eventually die and rot


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 4:08 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2014 8:41 pm
Posts: 9
Location: Long Island, NY
So what would you do then as far as a fence goes when adding a barrier.

1) neighbors fence--->my new fence---->barrier---->my yard?

or

2) neighbors fence--->barrier---->my new fence--->my yard

I would assume 1 makes most sense. Allowing new fence to butt right up against their POS fence, and then barrier along my new fence line so i can monitor runners trying to jump the barrier?


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 5:48 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 12:28 am
Posts: 1180
Location: Island off Cape Cod Massacusetts
Here is an install I did for customer in 2005. Rhizomes have not made past fence yet. Hope this gives you some ideas. The bamboos I planted were a lot more aggressive (and better looking along a fence) than P japonica.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 10:39 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:13 pm
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Location: St. Louis area Location Details
What material is that? What do you do at the ends (sides) of the beds?

_________________
Alan.
My blog: It's not work, it's gardening!


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2014 2:36 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 12:28 am
Posts: 1180
Location: Island off Cape Cod Massacusetts
The material is an ADS(I think) plastic used to cover landfills when they realized the leachate was wrecking the aquifers,(due to uninformed legislation about burying solid waste and the oxidation/reduction action that was caused) was surplus from that (statewide) project. Is similar to the 80 mil barrier sold at bamboo places, but came in 22 ft wide rolls weighing over a ton. In the picture with the skid steer, you can see landscape tie wrapped around end with barrier. Two years later, a barrier was added in front of planting with chain trencher.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2014 12:14 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 10:09 am
Posts: 241
Location: Austria
I've posted a link to this article before but apparently the university of weihenstephan has moved/removed it so here is a copy from bambus-deutschland.de which i've put through google translate.

Not all materials are suitable to be used as a barrier for bamboo. In this respect I believe it is better to be safe than sorry.

http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bambus-deutschland.de%2Fbambus-infos%2Frhizome%2Frhizomsperrentest-der-fh-weihenstephan.html&act=url

This picture from the article shows the type of material and in the first column the number of penetrations (I'm having a hard time translating the word "eindringungen", what they mean is that the rhizomes were able to pierce the seams but not the regular areas or didn't fully pierce the barrier) and the second one the number of full out pierce-throughs.

Image

Another thing to consider is that when you install the barrier you should try to avoid "corners" in which rhizomes can get stuck. Think of the barrier as something that guides water.
If water directly hits a wall/corner it will either go up or down, not sideways. The same happens with rhizomes. The less sharp edges you have, the better.

This is an example of what I believe is called the "dutch method" where Rhizomes are directed back inwards so they don't circle.
I think this actually gives a good example for both cases. If a bamboo is on the inside there are no hard edges. If you were to plant a bamboo on the outside those v-shaped edges practically ask for rhizomes to dive either down or up if they get caught in it

Image


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PostPosted: Fri May 02, 2014 7:33 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2014 8:41 pm
Posts: 9
Location: Long Island, NY
So i figured i'd follow up on this, and ask my one last question........

After a weekend of attempting to start cutting things down, and seeing how i'm going to dig the roots out, i realized i'm in way over my head for the depth and amount of growth we had. So we ended up hiring someone who specializes in bamboo removal and they actually just finished digging everything up today. They're installing a 36" barrier along the property line and reseeding my reclaimed yard with Hydroseed for new grass. Now all i have to do is watch for any missed shoots, pull em out of the ground, and shouldnt have a bamboo problem any more. He said it was actually not that agressive as far as runners and whatnot. There were large clumps, but minimal runners and thats why it never became massively invasive.

That being said, removal of the bamboo showed us jsut how terrible of shape the existing fence is in, so a fence replacement is due. So now that we just removed the bamboo on our side of the fence, theres still pretty heavy growth on their side right up to the current fence. My thinking was to install the barrier about 6" INTO my property from where the current fence is (which runs exactly on our property line), that way in the next couple of months, we can tear down the old fence, and install a new fence in between the barrier and where the old fence used to lie. New posts, new fence entirely. Now i'd love to go with a PVC to match the one we have on the back of the property, but my only worries are that since the fence will be installed on the side of the barrier that still has the bamboo, would any new shoots attempt to come up along the barrier and possibly under the fence panels enough to damage it? Dont wanna spend all that time and money putting in a new nice PVC fence, only to have a few errand shoots decide to come up directly underneath it and destroy it. Am i better off going with a standard wood fence which can be easily repaired?


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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2014 10:41 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 12:28 am
Posts: 1180
Location: Island off Cape Cod Massacusetts
I doubt the shoots could damage the fence. If they come up and hit the fence, they will be deflected by it.


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